Images from the Solitary Isolation Game

 

by Anne Elizabeth Moore

by Anne Elizabeth Moore

Stanley Howard—tortured by Jon Burge and Chicago Police Officers under his command, then sentenced to death row based on confessions extracted under torture but later commuted by Governor Ryan—called from prison to kick off the Emotional Games with a plea to bring problems in Chicago, and in Illinois, under control before embarking on a project like the Olympics. Julien Ball of the Campaign to End the Death Penalty kindly provided the context and the cell phone.

 

by Anne Elizabeth Moore

by Anne Elizabeth Moore

Stephen F. Eisenberg and Laurie Jo Reynolds of Tamms Year Ten introduce the Solitary Isolation Game and give a brief history of isolation as a prisoner reform tactic, before its condemnation by several international human rights tribunals.

 

by Anne Elizabeth Moore

by Anne Elizabeth Moore

by Anne Elizabeth Moore

by Anne Elizabeth Moore

 

by Anne Elizabeth Moore

by Anne Elizabeth Moore

Pre-hooding, the audience was treated to a talk by the 29-year-old Mustafa Afrika (above—his speech was so captivating our photographer was rendered useless) in which he described his early imprisonment and subsequent isolation at Tamms Supermax in great detail, as well as the lingering physical and emotional effects of spending several years with no human contact. Afrika, who has since returned to life on the South Side of Chicago, described the daily, ongoing police activity in his neighborhood, acknowledging that any increase to this hostility, such as that brought about by the Olympic Games’ presence in the area, would be extremely damaging to residents.

 

by Anne Elizabeth Moore

by Anne Elizabeth Moore

Johnny Walton, incarcerated at Tamms, described to the hooded audience the chilling long-term effects of solitary isolation. Describing prisoners whose only human contact was shouting over walls to fellow inmates for several years and men who became so desperate for human contact they would create a ruckus, causing guards to come in and physically quiet them, Walton was brilliantly impassioned. Several hooded audience members explained later that they were only relieved for the hoods because it kept others from being able to see them cry.

 

by Anne Elizabeth Moore

by Anne Elizabeth Moore

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